Constitutional Law

  • This Subject Area Index lists all CALI lessons covering Constitutional Law.
  • The Constitutional Law Outline allows you to search for terms of art that correspond to topics you are studying to find suggestions for related CALI Lessons.
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Abortion

This lesson can be used in a Constitutional Law or Family Law course, as preparation for class or as review for an exam on the topic of Abortion.

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Freedom of Speech: Underpinnings and Justifications

This lesson focuses on the justifications for giving Freedom of Speech, as protected under the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, a privileged and preferred position vis-à-vis other rights. It begins with an analysis of historical antecedents, and concludes with an analysis of the justifications themselves. The lesson is intended for students who have studied these issues in class and wish to refine and enhance their knowledge.

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Commercial Speech - First Amendment

This lesson covers First Amendment doctrine and theory pertaining to commercial speech. The lesson considers the development of commercial speech from unprotected to protected speech; the applicable constitutional tests for evaluating commercial speech, the doctrine regarding mandated disclosures in commercial contexts, and recent cases decided by the Roberts Court considering commercial speech.

The lesson assumes familiarity with the landmark cases and is best used as review or as an asynchronous class.

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Student Speech

This lesson addresses the First Amendment protections for student speech in public elementary and secondary schools. You willl learn about the legal standards from United States Supreme Court cases that apply to different types of student speech, and how lower courts have interpreted these standards. You will then apply these standards to factual scenarios in multiple choice and essay type questions. This lesson includes the standards that apply to off-campus and online speech.

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Overview on the Religion Clauses

This lesson is designed to provide you with an overview of the religion clauses (which include both the Establishment Clause and the Free Exercise Clause) of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution. The lesson is intended for students who have studied these issues in class, and who wish to refine their knowledge of these clauses.

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The Establishment Clause - Prevailing Tests

This lesson is designed to introduce you to the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution. It is one of a number of lessons on the religion clauses (which include the Establishment Clause and the Free Exercise Clause), and the first of several lessons on Establishment Clause issues. It is intended for students who have studied these issues and wish to refine their knowledge.

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Fourth Amendment Overview

This lesson is designed to introduce students to the Fourth Amendment prohibition against "unreasonable searches and seizures." The goal is to provide students with an overview of the history of the Fourth Amendment, as well as an introduction to the warrant requirement and the concept of warrantless searches.

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Defining the Term "Search"

This lesson is designed to help students understand the term "search" as it is used under the Fourth Amendment. As we shall see, the term is a term of art which does not always correspond to popular conceptions or definitions of the term search. In this lesson, we explore the various facets and definitions of the term. This lesson is intended for students who have studied these issues in class and who would like to refine their knowledge.

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Probable Cause

The requirement of "probable cause" is an integral part of the Fourth Amendment. The Amendment specifically provides that a warrant may not issue except on probable cause. In addition, some exceptions to the warrant requirement necessitate a finding of probable cause. This lesson examines the concept of probable cause under the Fourth Amendment. This lesson is intended for students who have studied the concept of probable cause in class and wish to refine their knowledge and understanding.

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