Law School Materials for Success

The first year of law school is, for many people, one of the most significant transitions of their adult life. Law school demands a lot as it helps you make the transition from your prior identity as student (or as some other occupational role) to your new identity as an attorney. To meet the demands of law school, it is often helpful to have the big picture before you begin – a sense of what it is you are trying to do as you prepare for classes, participate in those classes, review and prepare for exams, take exams, and then begin the cycle once again.

Basic Income Tax, Second Edition

An updated 4th Edition is available here, August 2016. 

This book is the second edition of a basic income tax text.  It is intended to be a readable text, suitable for a three-hour course for a class comprised of law students with widely different backgrounds. The text integrates several of the CALI drills that Professor James Edward Maule (Villanova University) prepared.

199,939 Words, 595 Pages in PDF

Published 2014

Electronic Discovery

Discovery is the court-related process during litigation through which the parties exchange information relevant to the dispute, including "documents" and "things." In 1970, the rule was amended to add "data compilations." As digital methods of communication and data storage became increasingly common, the discovery rules changed again. They now include a separate category called "electronically stored information" (ESI).

In some ways, discovery of ESI is the same as any other discovery. The rules about relevance and proportionality apply, as do the rules about privilege. Nevertheless, there are some qualities of electronically stored information that present unique issues. It is these special characteristics and associated rules that are the focus of this lesson.

Author of the Week: Professor Sonia Green at The John Marshall Law School, Chicago

Professor Green teaches Civil Procedure, Conflicts of Law, Lawyering Skills, and a seminar on Assisted Reproductive Technology and the Law. Professor Green received her BA, MA and JD from the University of Chicago. While at the University of Chicago Law School, Professor Green was awarded a Ford Foundation Scholarship to study at the Hague Academy of International Law. She practiced in insurance and commercial litigation with two Chicago law firms. Before joining the John Marshall faculty, she was Assistant Professor of Legal Research and Writing at IIT/Chicago-Kent College of Law.  A mother of four boys, Professor Green is passionate about education and tries to help her students find that elusive work-life balance. She works closely with students in her classes to help each student learn Best, and teaches using innovative methods like CALI lessons.

Race and Equal Protection

This Lesson considers race under the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment as well as under other constitutional provisions, with the exception of "affirmative action" which is the subject of a separate lesson. It can be used as an introduction or as review.

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