Law School Materials for Success

The first year of law school is, for many people, one of the most significant transitions of their adult life. Law school demands a lot as it helps you make the transition from your prior identity as student (or as some other occupational role) to your new identity as an attorney. To meet the demands of law school, it is often helpful to have the big picture before you begin – a sense of what it is you are trying to do as you prepare for classes, participate in those classes, review and prepare for exams, take exams, and then begin the cycle once again.

Basic Income Tax, Second Edition

An updated 4th Edition is available here, August 2016. 

This book is the second edition of a basic income tax text.  It is intended to be a readable text, suitable for a three-hour course for a class comprised of law students with widely different backgrounds. The text integrates several of the CALI drills that Professor James Edward Maule (Villanova University) prepared.

199,939 Words, 595 Pages in PDF

Published 2014

Author of the Week: Professor Beth Thornburg from Southern Methodist University Dedman School of Law

Professor Thornburg teaches and writes in the area of civil procedure. Drawing on her experience with civil rights and commercial litigation, her scholarship focuses on the procedural fairness of the litigation process, especially at the pleadings, discovery, and jury charge stages. She also writes and speaks in the areas of comparative procedure, judicial ethics, online dispute resolution, and the intersection of law and culture. Professor Thornburg teaches Civil Procedure, Conflict of Laws, Complex Litigation, Texas procedure, Remedies, and an advanced procedure seminar. To learn more about her, visit her website at https://sites.google.com/site/beththornburg/home

Removal and Remand: The Basics

This lesson is designed to help students understand the basics of three statutes that govern the removal of civil actions from state to federal court: 28 U.S.C. § 1441 (removal of civil actions), § 1446 (removal procedure) and § 1447 (procedure after removal). It consists of both explanatory text and problems and is divided into three sections. Students can complete all three sections at the same time or do each section separately.

Author of the Week: Allan Stein from Rutgers Law School

Allan Stein is Professor of Law at Rutgers Law School, where he teaches Civil Procedure and Federal Courts. He has also taught as a Visiting Professor at the University of Texas, NYU, Boston University and the University of Pennsylvania. Professor Stein is the co-author of Civil Procedure: Theory and Practice (Wolters Kluwer, 5th Ed) (with Linda Silberman and Tobias Wolff). He has written extensively on personal jurisdiction and related court-access doctrines, including articles in the Yale, Texas, Pennsylvania and Northwestern Law Reviews. He is a graduate of NYU Law School and Haverford College.

Venue

This lesson teaches and reviews the concept of venue, both generally and under federal law. There is also a brief discussion of venue under state law and common law.

Learning outcomes
On completion of the lesson, the student will be able to:
1. Analyze venue in federal court using the general federal venue statute.
2. Explain some common special situations in which the general statute does not provide the answer.
3. Explain that the analysis of venue statutes other than the general venue statute may be unexpected and require creative arguments.

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