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  • This Subject Area Index lists all CALI lessons covering Administrative Law.
  • The Administrative Law Outline allows you to search for terms of art that correspond to topics you are studying to find suggestions for related CALI Lessons.

Administrative Law

Deliberative Process Privilege

This lesson examines the so-called "deliberative process privilege" (DPP) (a/k/a, "predecisional and deliberative privilege"). The DPP is a variant of Executive Privilege, and is applied to protect the confidentiality of administrative communications in various contexts. This lesson is intended for students who have studied the DPP in class, and who wish to refine and expand their knowledge.

Ex Parte Communications in Administrative Law

Note: This lesson uses Flash and is unable to be viewed on a device that does not have the Flash player installed. Scoring for this lesson is also unavailable at this time.

This lesson examines the source of ex parte communications in administrative agencies, the typical targets of such communications, and the law which governs them. It treats both formal and informal proceedings and both rulemaking and adjudication procedures.

Formal Rulemaking

This lesson introduces you to the so-called "formal" process for making administrative rules and regulations. Under the federal Administrative Procedure Act, there are two separate and distinct processes for making rules: the "informal" process and the "formal" process. In a prior lesson, we examined the informal process. This lesson examines the formal process in greater detail. The lesson is designed for students who have studied these issues in class and who wish to refine their knowledge and understanding of the issues.

Freedom of Information Act

This lesson focuses primarily on the federal Freedom of Information Act. The lesson begins with an overview on the origins of the Act and its basic structure. The lesson then examines threshold questions that a user of the Freedom of Information Act must consider, and key questions for analysis and application. This lesson examines which agencies are subject to the Freedom of Information Act, whether the document sought is a "record" under the Act, and finally, are any exemptions applicable.

Hearing Procedures Required by Due Process - The Basic Analysis

Note: This lesson uses Flash and is unable to be viewed on a device that does not have the Flash player installed. Scoring for this lesson is also unavailable at this time.

This lesson presents a schematic flowchart or algorithm illustrating one approach to determining whether due process applies to a particular agency hearing and, if it does, how one determines what procedures are required and the time at which they must be made available. It references several of the basic Supreme Court cases (Goldberg, Roth, Perry, Goss, Mathews, etc.).

Hybrid Rules

In this lesson, we examine the hybrid rulemaking process. In other words, we examine rules that are not created through the formal rulemaking process (as that process is defined in the federal Administrative Procedure Act (APA)), or by a strictly informal process (again, as defined by the APA), but by a process that is somewhere between formal and informal processes. The lesson is intended for students who have studied these issues in class, and who wish to further refine their knowledge.

Informal Rulemaking

This lesson examines the "informal" rulemaking process. Under the Administrative Procedure Act, this type of rulemaking is also called "notice and comment" rulemaking. In this lesson, we examine the procedural steps that an administrative agency must follow in order to create a valid "informal" rule. This lesson is intended for students who have studied these issues in class and wish to further refine their knowledge.

Introduction and Sources of Authority for Administrative Law

This exercise begins with some general background questions to help students place administrative agencies within the greater Constitutional scheme. These questions also address the various powers agencies wield, and the ways they are created. Then the exercise examines several print and online directory sources that offer specific details on individual agencies; it goes on to briefly discuss procedural rules, policy statements, and the process of promulgating regulations. The exercise concludes with review questions.

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