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Evidence

Best Evidence Rule Under the Federal Rules

This exercise is designed to guide the student through the basics of the best evidence/original document rule under the federal rules. The exercise progresses logically through the rule. In order, it looks at the definition of “writing, recording, or photograph,” the concept of proving “content of a writing,” the definition of “original” and “duplicate,” proof of “collateral” matters, material in possession of the opposite party, computer printouts, compilations, secondary evidence (Is there a “second best evidence” rule?), and the division of function between the judge and jury.

The Concept of Hearsay

Students are given hypothetical fact situations and asked whether the testimony offered would be hearsay. The exercise provides practice in applying the concept that an utterance is hearsay if it is offered to show the truth of matters asserted therein. It contains examples of utterances that are not hearsay because they are offered to show their effect upon the auditor, because they are legally operative language, or because they are offered as circumstantial evidence of the declarant’s state of mind. Questions about the hearsay status of nonverbal conduct are also included.

The Definition of Hearsay and the Federal Rules Part 1: Substantive Rules and Hearsay Dangers

This lesson is part of another CALI lesson "The Definition of Hearsay and the Federal Rules." That lesson was divided into three parts for students who wish to cover the material in smaller modules. This lesson prepares the student for material covered in the final two modules, "The Definition of Hearsay and the Federal Rules Part 2: Statements and What They Assert" and "The Definition of Hearsay and the Federal Rules Part 3: Hearsay Arguments."

The Definition of Hearsay and the Federal Rules Part 2: Statements and What They Assert

This lesson is part of another CALI lesson "The Definition of Hearsay and the Federal Rules." That lesson was divided into three parts for students who wish to cover the material in smaller modules. This lesson builds on material covered in the first module, "The Definition of Hearsay and the Federal Rules Part 1: Substantive Rules and Hearsay Dangers" and prepares the student for material covered in the final module, "The Definition of Hearsay and the Federal Rules Part 3: Hearsay Arguments."

The Definition of Hearsay and the Federal Rules Part 3: Hearsay Arguments

This lesson is part of another CALI lesson "The Definition of Hearsay and the Federal Rules." That lesson was divided into three parts for students who wish to cover the material in smaller modules. This lesson builds on the material covered in the first two modules, "The Definition of Hearsay and the Federal Rules Part 1: Substantive Rules and Hearsay Dangers" and "The Definition of Hearsay and the Federal Rules Part 2: Statements and What They Assert."

Expert and Opinion Evidence

This exercise applies hypotheticals to situations involving expert witnesses. Analysis relies primarily on the Federal Rules of Evidence. Expert testimony in both civil and criminal contexts is covered, as the exercise consists of two trials: the first is a civil case, the second a criminal prosecution.

Federal Rule 801(d) and Multiple Hearsay

This exercise is the counterpart of The Definition of Hearsay and the Federal Rules, which covers the definition of hearsay under Federal Rules of Evidence 801(a)-(c). The new exercise includes graphic reviews of each subsection of 801(d), and graphic illustrations of multiple hearsay, as well as interactive flowcharts for the subsections of 801(d). The program lends itself to use by students who either (i) want a relatively quick-review, with detailed work limited to those issues they find troublesome or (ii) want to review each relevant section of the rules in some detail.

Four FRE 803 Hearsay Exceptions: Availability Immaterial

This exercise covers these four, most commonly used, specific exceptions to the Hearsay rule: 1) Present sense impressions; 2) Excited utterances; 3) State of Mind; and 4) Business records. The student will be applying these four exceptions in the context of scenarios presenting hypotheticals. The student's goal in this lesson is to work with the four exceptions, to gain a basic understanding of them with a focus on those fundamentals and problem areas identified in the FRE's Advisory Committee's Notes, recent judicial decisions, and legal commentators.

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