Author of the Week: Professor David Welkowitz from Whittier Law School

Professor Welkowitz joined the Whittier faculty in 1983. Prior to that time, he practiced law as a litigation associate with Stroock & Stroock & Lavan in New York. At Whittier, he has taught numerous courses, to first-years and upper-level students alike. His primary teaching emphases have been Civil Procedure and intellectual property, particularly Trademark law. He has also created more than a dozen lessons for the Center for Automated Legal Instruction (CALI) in Civil Procedure, Trademarks, and Copyright. He was a CALI Fellow in Trademarks in 2003 and a CALI Fellow in Copyright in 2004. From 2006-2009, he served as the Director of the Whittier Law School Center for Intellectual Property Law. His scholarship has ranged from topics in Civil Procedure to various intellectual property issues, both domestic and international. He is the author of a treatise on Trademark Dilution law and a co-author of a casebook on Rights of Publicity. His articles have been cited by courts, treatise writers in both Civil Procedure and Trademarks, and numerous articles.​

Liberty, Equality, and Due Process: Cases, Controversies, and Contexts in Constitutional Law

This Casebook is intended to be used in a course which concentrates on Constitutional Rights and centers the Fourteenth Amendment. It can be used in a first year Law School course with a title such as “Liberty, Equality, and Due Process,” as it is at CUNY School of Law, an upper division Constitutional Rights course, or an advanced undergraduate course focusing on constitutional rights, especially equality and due process.

Author of the Week: Professor Deborah Challener from Mississippi College School of Law

Professor Challener teaches primarily civil procedure and related courses. She has published several articles on civil procedure issues and is the author of four chapters in Mississippi Civil Procedure. She formerly served as a member of the Mississippi Supreme Court Advisory Committee on Rules and is currently a CALI Civil Procedure Fellow. Professor Challener received her B.A. degree from Oberlin College, her Master’s degree in Public Policy from Vanderbilt University, and her J.D. from the University of Tennessee College of Law. Prior to teaching at Mississippi College School of Law, she taught at the University of Maine and Washburn University, worked for the law firm of Morrison & Foerster in San Francisco and clerked for two federal judges.

Author of the Week: Professor Beth Thornburg from Southern Methodist University Dedman School of Law

Professor Thornburg teaches and writes in the area of civil procedure. Drawing on her experience with civil rights and commercial litigation, her scholarship focuses on the procedural fairness of the litigation process, especially at the pleadings, discovery, and jury charge stages. She also writes and speaks in the areas of comparative procedure, judicial ethics, online dispute resolution, and the intersection of law and culture. Professor Thornburg teaches Civil Procedure, Conflict of Laws, Complex Litigation, Texas procedure, Remedies, and an advanced procedure seminar. To learn more about her, visit her website at https://sites.google.com/site/beththornburg/home

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Removal and Remand: The Basics

This lesson is designed to help students understand the basics of three statutes that govern the removal of civil actions from state to federal court: 28 U.S.C. § 1441 (removal of civil actions), § 1446 (removal procedure) and § 1447 (procedure after removal). It consists of both explanatory text and problems and is divided into three sections. Students can complete all three sections at the same time or do each section separately.

Author of the Week: Allan Stein from Rutgers Law School

Allan Stein is Professor of Law at Rutgers Law School, where he teaches Civil Procedure and Federal Courts. He has also taught as a Visiting Professor at the University of Texas, NYU, Boston University and the University of Pennsylvania. Professor Stein is the co-author of Civil Procedure: Theory and Practice (Wolters Kluwer, 5th Ed) (with Linda Silberman and Tobias Wolff). He has written extensively on personal jurisdiction and related court-access doctrines, including articles in the Yale, Texas, Pennsylvania and Northwestern Law Reviews. He is a graduate of NYU Law School and Haverford College.

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