Resales of Securities Under Rule 144

This lesson is an introduction to the Rule 144 safe harbor exemption for resales of securities. It discusses the basic conditions under which both affiliates and non-affiliates may resell securities without Securities Act registration. Before working through this lesson, students should have a basic understanding of the registration requirement of the Securities Act of 1933 and the restrictions in section 5 of that Act. The lesson provides links to the relevant regulatory provisions, but you might find it helpful to have your own copy of Rule 144.

CALI Announces Katherine Alteneder, Executive Director at Self-Represented Litigation Network, as the CALIcon18 Conference Keynote Speaker

CALIcon18 Keynote Session: How Do Lawyers Get Paid If Access to Justice is Free?

The rise of the self-represented litigant has disrupted the civil justice system. Courts no longer rely on lawyers to manage the litigants, but the due process remains so courts have had to step-up and create user-friendly systems for lay people. By providing comprehensive, 24/7 self-help services such as forms, instructions, tailored procedural guidance, and triaged case flow management; courts can create transparent and navigable systems. However, the bespoke approach contemplated in an adversarial process is lost without lawyers. Lawyers are still very much needed, however, their new role is only beginning to be understood. It is one that has paradoxically narrowed in focus yet, because of technology, expanded in delivery opportunities. Legal education has an opportunity to equip new lawyers with the legal and practical skills to be successful in today’s legal market that demands 24/7 services accessible by cellphone from anywhere in the world while engaging more autonomous clients who seek refined and targeted legal advice, strategy and big-picture analysis. This talk will explore the many opportunities that are presenting in this re-aligning market, and consider the negative and positive impacts, particularly with respect to technology, on access to justice.

South Dakota Legal Research: Primary and Secondary Resources

This lesson will familiarize you with primary and secondary sources available in South Dakota. It covers South Dakota primary law including the South Dakota Constitution, statutes, legislative history, municipal codes, administrative law, and court decisions. The secondary sources section of the lesson provides a general overview of secondary sources and how you can use them in your research as well as coverage of South Dakota specific secondary sources.

Author of the Week: Matt Novak from University of Nebraska - Lincoln College of Law

Matt Novak is an associate professor and reference librarian at the Marvin and Virginia Schmid Law Library of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln College of Law. Prior to joining the Schmid Law Library, he was an Assistant Public Defender with the Missouri Public Defender System. In addition to his reference duties, Professor Novak co-teaches the legal research component of the First Year Legal Research and Writing Course. He has lectured on legal research and legal information technology issues. Professor Novak received his B.A. from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, his J.D. from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln College of Law, and his M.A. in Library Science from the University of Missouri-Columbia. He is a member of the Nebraska Bar Association, the Missouri Bar Association, the American Bar Association, the American Association of Law Libraries, and the Mid-America Association of Law Libraries.​​

Discovery Processes

This lesson is part of a series of lessons about Discovery. Discovery is the process through which the parties exchange information, documents, electronically-stored information, and sometimes even tangible things. This particular lesson focuses on the processes lawyers use to create, respond to, and have disputes about discovery.

Author of the Week: Professor Joseph M. Grohman from Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad College of Law

Joe Grohman joined the College of Law's full time faculty in August 1983. His primary teaching responsibilities involve Property, Real Property Closing Workshop and Real Estate Transactions and Finance. For the Center for Computer Legal Instruction (CALI), he was a member of the Board of Directors and continues as a member of the Editorial Board. As noted in the publications section of his curriculum vitae, he has authored and co-authored various articles, treatise chapters, and CALI interactive lessons for law students. For Nova Southeastern University he serves as the Executive Dean for Faculty Development and is active in the university's academic program review process, chairing NSU's Academic Review Committee.

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