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  • This Subject Area Index lists all CALI lessons covering Criminal Procedure.
  • The Criminal Procedure Outline allows you to search for terms of art that correspond to topics you are studying to find suggestions for related CALI Lessons.

Criminal Procedure

Identifications in Criminal Cases: Law and Practice

This lesson examines identification procedures in criminal cases through a short exploration of problems that can arise in making an identification, a primer on basic constitutional rules and the problem of suggestiveness, and a simple criminal case in which you act as an investigator and see the legal consequences of choosing different identification procedures. A concluding essay question gives you a chance to test your knowledge.

Miranda I: Custody, Interrogation and Waiver

This lesson reviews Miranda v. Arizona, 384 U.S. 436 (1966), one of the most well known and important cases ever decided by the United States Supreme Court. The lesson reviews the reasoning and holding of Miranda and examines the issues of custody, interrogation, and waiver. A different lesson, Miranda II, explores issues relating to the assertions by a suspect of the rights provided by Miranda; the application of the exclusionary rule to violations of Miranda; and exceptions to and limits on the Miranda rule.

Miranda II: Assertion of the Rights, Exceptions, and Other Limits

This lesson is the second lesson reviewing Miranda v. Arizona, 384 U.S. 436 (1966). This lesson explores issues relating to the assertions by a suspect of the rights provided by Miranda--the right to silence and the right to an attorney prior to questioning; the application of the exclusionary rule to violations of Miranda; and exceptions to and limits on the Miranda rule.

Other Constitutional Limits to Interrogation

In addition to the limitations imposed upon interrogations by Miranda, the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment and the Sixth Amendment right to counsel also constrain law enforcement authority in the interrogation context. This lesson will discuss those additional constitutional limitations. Although it isn't necessary to have mastered the Miranda limitations at this point, some familiarity with those standards will be helpful.

Plain View Doctrine

The plain view doctrine is an exception to the warrant requirement that allows an officer to seize items that she observes from a lawful vantage point, to which she has a lawful right of access, and which are immediately apparent as contraband or evidence of a crime. In this lesson, you will review both the theory and the application of the plain view doctrine.

Plain View Exception

This lesson examines the so-called "plain view" exception to the warrant requirement. Even though the Fourth Amendment contains a warrant requirement, the United States Supreme Court has recognized numerous exceptions to that requirement, including the plain view exception. This lesson is intended for students who have studied this issue in class and wish to refine their knowledge.

Plea & Discovery

These two exercises are offered to familiarize students with what prosecuting and defense attorneys do from the time an investigation begins until trial preparation and why they do it. Special attention is given to correspondence, pleadings, and the guilty plea. The framework for both exercises is federal practice.

Pre-indictment & Charge

These two exercises are offered to familiarize students with what prosecuting and defense attorneys do from the time an investigation begins until trial preparation and why they do it. Special attention is given to correspondence, pleadings, and the guilty plea. The framework for both exercises is federal practice.

Probable Cause

The requirement of "probable cause" is an integral part of the Fourth Amendment. The Amendment specifically provides that a warrant may not issue except on probable cause. In addition, some exceptions to the warrant requirement necessitate a finding of probable cause. This lesson examines the concept of probable cause under the Fourth Amendment. This lesson is intended for students who have studied the concept of probable cause in class and wish to refine their knowledge and understanding.

Probable Cause to Search or Seize

This lesson reviews the concept of probable cause as defined and applied by the United States Supreme Court. It reviews the Aguilar-Spinelli "two-prong test" as well as the "totality of the circumstances" test developed in Illinois v. Gates, 462 U.S. 213 (1983). The lesson assumes the student has read the Gates decision and discussed it in class. It attempts to enhance the student's understanding of the cases and provides opportunities for the student to apply the tests to several fact patterns.

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