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  • This Subject Area Index lists all CALI lessons covering Civil Procedure.
  • The Civil Procedure Outline allows you to search for terms of art that correspond to topics you are studying to find suggestions for related CALI Lessons.

Civil Procedure

Buffalo Creek: A Game of Discovery (Initial Disclosure Version)

This lesson has been temporaily removed for revisions. Thank you for your patience. CALI

Effective December 1, 2006, the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure were amended to reflect changes in discovery resulting from the electronic storage of information. CALI's lessons do not yet reflect these amendments. As each lesson is revised to reflect the amended rules, the lesson's catalog description will be updated to enable students and faculty to easily tell which lessons include the amended rules.

Class Action Basics

This lesson teaches the basics of class action procedure under Federal Rule 23. The lesson focuses on the requirements of Rules 23(a) and 23(b). (It does not cover jurisdictional issues, appeals, issues of class management, or class settlement.)

Discovery Privileges: Work Product

This lesson is part of a series of lessons about Discovery. Rule 26(b) of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure describes the scope of discovery: This lesson will explore the doctrine of attorney work product. Material that falls under the work product doctrine ordinarily need not be produced in discovery, even if it is extremely relevant.

Discovery Privileges: Attorney-Client Privilege

This lesson is part of a series of lessons about Discovery. If something is privileged, then, it is not discoverable even though it is relevant and proportional. This lesson will explore the doctrine of attorney-client privilege in the context of civil discovery in federal court litigation. Communications protected by the privilege are not discoverable, even if they are extremely relevant.

Discovery Processes

This lesson is part of a series of lessons about Discovery. Discovery is the process through which the parties exchange information, documents, electronically-stored information, and sometimes even tangible things. This particular lesson focuses on the processes lawyers use to create, respond to, and have disputes about discovery.

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