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2L-3L Upper Level Lesson Topics

Architectural Works

This lesson explores the protection of architectural works (building designs) both under the 1976 Copyright Act and after adoption of the Architectural Works Copyright Protection Act of 1990. It assumes familiarity with the rules applicable to useful articles, the idea-expression dichotomy, and basic copyright infringement analysis, including its application to selection and arrangement compilations. It can be used either as a stand-alone treatment or to supplement in-class discussion when constrained by time.

Authority: Actual and Apparent

This lesson discusses the power that an agent (or apparent agent) has to affect the legal rights of the principal. In general, an agent or apparent agent may affect the principal's legal rights only to the extent that the agent possesses the authority or the power to do so. This lesson provides an introduction to the three basic types of authority -- actual authority, apparent authority, and inherent agency power.

Aviation Accident Investigation Compared to Civil Litigation

This lesson discusses the statutory basis for aviation accident investigations. The discussion centers around case studies of two aviation accident investigations. A comparison is drawn between federal statutes and regulations enabling aviation accident investigations and civil actions of the same cases. Specifically, why does the federal government investigate aviation accidents rather than states? What statutes guide accident investigations? What is the objective of accident investigations? What is the relationship, if any, of civil litigation and accident investigations?

Aviation Law: Sources of Law and Jurisdiction

In the United States, federal laws extensively regulate aircraft, airlines, pilots, and airports. People and companies involved in aviation need to be familiar with these federal laws, as well as state and international regulations that affect aircraft and airlines. The Federal Aviation Administration, the National Transportation Safety Administration, and the Department of Transportation, as well as state laws and international treaties, all play a role in regulating aviation.

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