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1L - First Year Lesson Topics

The Seal

This lesson assumes students are familiar with the requirement of consideration. This exercise covers one of the exceptions to this general rule. Historically, one situation where consideration was not required to create a binding contract was when the promise was made "under seal." The lesson explains the history of "the seal" and the seal's role in contract law today.

Self-Defense

This is a lesson dealing with the basic justification defense of self-defense. Understanding the basics of self-defense is essential to understanding many or all of the justification defenses. The purpose of this lesson is to present very simply the elements of self-defense.

Sources of Criminal Law

This exercise provides an overview of the sources of American substantive criminal law. Particular attention is paid to the Model Penal Code and the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines.

Learning Outcomes
On completion of the lesson, the student will be able to:
1. Explain the role of the three branches of government in the making of criminal law.
2. Explain why the model penal code is studied.

South Dakota Legal Research: Primary and Secondary Resources

This lesson will familiarize you with primary and secondary sources available in South Dakota. It covers South Dakota primary law including the South Dakota Constitution, statutes, legislative history, municipal codes, administrative law, and court decisions. The secondary sources section of the lesson provides a general overview of secondary sources and how you can use them in your research as well as coverage of South Dakota specific secondary sources.

Standing (Constitutional Issues) Introduction

A critical issue that arises in many administrative cases is the question of constitutional standing to litigate. At its most basic, standing is the requirement that a litigant must have a sufficient interest in the outcome of the litigation in order to be entitled to sue. This lesson provides an introduction to constitutional standing issues and provides the basis for more in depth review in subsequent lessons. The lesson is intended for students who have studied these issues in class and who wish to further refine their knowledge.

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